Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

  • Postdoc
  • Mechanistic dissection of the virome and its role in human health
  • Applications have closed
Lab Website: www.suezlab.org

SuezLab Baltimore, MD, USA


Description:

The Suez lab is looking for a postdoctoral fellow to work on several exciting projects related to the virome and its importance in human health. Naturally occurring eukaryotic viruses and phages are a part of the complex human microbiome. We combine computational and experimental approaches to understand the mechanisms through which they affect human health.
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Our systems microbiology group is part of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (ranked #1 in the US). Members of our team have access to and are trained with state-of-the-art resources required for microbiome research, including a gnotobiotic mouse facility, anaerobic culturing systems, metabolomics and genomics cores.

The position is fully-funded for 5 years.


Responsibilities:

- Independently lead a research project on the human virome. Additional projects will be discussed during the fellowship period - we can help you develop your own ideas.

- Mentor graduate, rotation, and undergraduate students.

- Present your work in group meetings, departmental seminars, and scientific conferences.

- Write research manuscripts and reviews.

- Participate in grant writing and peer-reviewing.


Qualifications/Preferred Skillsets:

A PhD and/or MD with research experience in basic microbiology / immunology, including molecular biology techniques, cell culture, as well as in vivo murine models. Previous microbiome research or bioinformatic skills are preferred but not mandatory - we will train you!
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We are looking for collegial individuals who will contribute to forming a collaborative and inclusive research environment. As a mentor, I am committed to promoting equity and fostering an inclusive, safe and collaborative environment where everyone feels welcome, regardless of race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation.



Featured Publications:

1. Montassier E, Valdés-Mas R, Batard E, Zmora N, Dori-Bachash M, Suez J, Elinav E. Probiotics impact the antibiotic resistance gene reservoir along the human GI tract in a person-specific and antibiotic-dependent manner. Nat Microbiol. 2021 Aug;6(8):1043-1054. doi: 10.1038/s41564-021-00920-0. Epub 2021 Jul 5. PubMed PMID: 34226711; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC8318886.
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2. Suez J, Zmora N, Zilberman-Schapira G, Mor U, Dori-Bachash M, Bashiardes S, Zur M, Regev-Lehavi D, Ben-Zeev Brik R, Federici S, Horn M, Cohen Y, Moor AE, Zeevi D, Korem T, Kotler E, Harmelin A, Itzkovitz S, Maharshak N, Shibolet O, Pevsner-Fischer M, Shapiro H, Sharon I, Halpern Z, Segal E, Elinav E. Post-Antibiotic Gut Mucosal Microbiome Reconstitution Is Impaired by Probiotics and Improved by Autologous FMT. Cell. 2018 Sep 6;174(6):1406-1423.e16. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2018.08.047. PubMed PMID: 30193113.
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3. Suez J, Korem T, Zeevi D, Zilberman-Schapira G, Thaiss CA, Maza O, Israeli D, Zmora N, Gilad S, Weinberger A, Kuperman Y, Harmelin A, Kolodkin-Gal I, Shapiro H, Halpern Z, Segal E, Elinav E. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota. Nature. 2014 Oct 9;514(7521):181-6. doi: 10.1038/nature13793.


Something about the PI: Science is a serious matter, where ethics, rigor, and quality of research are critical. At the same time, I believe science can, and should be, fun!
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